May 2022

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05/01/2022 - 7:30pm

Benaroya Hall, Taper Foundation Auditorium
An Evening with Neil Gaiman
Benaroya Hall, Taper Foundation Auditorium
200 University Street
Seattle, WA 98101
Our friends at Northwest Associated Arts again present acclaimed novelist and storyteller Neil Gaiman, he of numerous works of imaginative fiction for readers young and old, and the recipient of four Hugo, two Nebula, one World Fantasy, four Bram Stoker, fifteen Eisner and numerous other award-winning novels, stories, graphic narratives and films. His evenings here at Benaroya have been captivating, compelling, memorable. His many works include the Sandman comics, Neverwhere, Anansi Boys, Good Omens (with Terry Pratchett), American Gods, Norse Mythology, The Day I Swapped My Dad for Two Goldfish, The Wolves in the Walls, and more.  “Gaiman is, simply put, a treasure-house of story, and we are lucky to have him.”— Stephen King. “Gaiman has a rich imagination . . . and an ability to tackle large themes.”— Philip Pullman.   This is scheduled to be live/in-person program at Benaroya Hall presented by NWAA, KNKX 88.5fm & The Stranger. Elliott Bay Book Company will be on hand with books for sale, including (it is planned) a selection of pre-signed copies.   Tickets/information   
 

05/02/2022 - 6:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Sanaa Seif with Sharif Abdel Kouddous
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Making this Seattle visit as part of a national, in-person tour around the U.S. are Egyptian activist, film editor, and one-time political prisoner Sanaa Seif, along with Cairo-based independent journalist Sharif Abdel Kouddous. They will be discussing the extraordinary book of Sanaa Seif’s imprisoned brother Alaa Abd El-Fattah’s writings, You Have Not Been Defeated: Selected Works (Seven Stories). Alaa Abd El-Fattah is probably the highest profile political prisoner currently being held in Egypt - one of many, however, including Sanaa Seif herself until recently. “You can’t jail a revolution. Alaa Abd el-Fattah is proof. These essays, many handwritten and smuggled from a prison cell, breathe life into the 2011 moment, what shaped its revolutionary possibilities and terrible betrayals. This book is a memory of Tahrir Square that still reverberates like a heartbeat throughout the world.”– Nick Estes. “In a totalitarian system where even ideas are punishable with imprisonment, this collection of essays from one of Egypt’s most high-profile political prisoners is like an oasis in a desolate landscape. Part manifesto, part memoir, and part record of some of Abd El-Fattah’s trial scenes that are more than worthy of Kafka, the book contains passages smuggled out from Cairo’s infamous Tora prison.”– Ruth Michaelson, The Guardian. “Written with blood and fire, You Have Not Yet Been Defeated is a brilliant and devastating testament by one of Egypt's great revolutionaries.”– Molly Crabapple. This is scheduled to be a live/in-person program at Elliott Bay Book Company. Registration is optional.    Registration/information  
 

05/03/2022 - 7:00pm

Seattle Central Public Library
Douglas Stuart
Seattle Central Public Library
1000 Fourth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98104
We are delighted to help welcome 2020 Man Booker Prize winning novelist Douglas Stuart to Seattle, he of the winning and much-loved debut novel, Shuggie Bain, which would be occasion enough for this Seattle appearance this evening. But there is another new novel already in hand, Young Mungo (Grove), also set in a grittily depicted Glasgow,  which coming with  praises and anticipations of its own. “The astonishing sophomore effort from Booker Prize winner Stuart details a teen’s hard life in north Glasgow in the post-Thatcher years . . . Stuart’s writing is stellar . . . He’s too fine a storyteller to go for a sentimental ending, and the final act leaves the reader gutted. This is unbearably sad, more so because the reader comes to cherish the characters their creator has brought to life. It’s a sucker punch to the heart.”—Publishers Weekly. “A searing, gorgeously written portrait of a young gay boy trying to be true to himself in a place and time that demands conformity to social and gender rules . . . Stuart’s tale could be set anywhere that poverty, socioeconomic inequality, or class struggles exist, which is nearly everywhere. But it is also about the narrowness and failure of vision in a place where individuals cannot imagine a better life, where people have never been outside their own neighborhood . . . Stuart’s prize-winning, best-selling debut, Shuggie Bain, ensures great enthusiasm for his second novel of young, dangerous love.”—Booklist. In addition to winning the 2020 Booker Prize, Shuggie Bain also won the Sue Kaufman Prize, and was a finalist for the National Book Award, PEN/Hemingway Award, the National Book Critics Circle Prize, and the Kirkus Prize. This is scheduled to be a live/in-person program (with online streaming) held at Seattle Public Central Library. This event is co-presented by The Seattle Public Library and Elliott Bay Book Company.    Tickets/information (tickets for online and in person)    
 

05/03/2022 - 7:00pm

Pigott Auditorium, Seattle University
Cynthia B. Dillard
Pigott Auditorium, Seattle University
901 12th Ave
Seattle, WA 98122
Seattle University’s incoming dean of the College of Education, Dr. Cynthia B. Dillard (whom we remember in her earlier Seattle life), recently the Mary Frances Early Professor in Teacher Education and chair of the Department of Educational Theory and Practice at the University of Georgia, marks her arrival at Seattle University with a presentation, “Reigniting Education in the Spirit of Our Work,” drawn in part from her newest book, The Spirit of Our Work: Black Women Teachers (Re)member (Beacon Press). Dr. Dillard (aka Nana Mansa II of Mpesaem, Ghana) is also the author of On Spiritual Strivings and Learning to (Re)member the Things We’ve Learned to Forget. “With breathtaking prose, Cynthia Dillard has written a love letter to Black women teachers. The Spirit of Our Work beautifully anchors itself in the dynamism, creativity, and magic of Black women and girls. For all who teach and for all who learn, this book offers a brilliant roadmap for creating learning spaces in which we welcome and celebrate the fullness of our shared and expansive humanity.”—Treva B. Lindsey. This is schedule to be a live/in-person event at the Seattle University, Pigott Auditorium. The event is co-presented by Seattle University College of Education and Elliott Bay Book Company.   Free registration/information  
 

05/04/2022 - 11:00am to 8:00pm

Virtual Event
Crosscut Festival Virtual Program
Virtual Event
The Crosscut Festival, annually devoted to discussions and presentations of subjects including public affairs, politics, journalism, social justice, technology, the environment, and more, over a series of days and evenings.  Programs, in-person (on Saturday, May 7) and virtual, May 4-6, begin today with virtual programs featuring Elizabeth Kolbert, Carl Zimmer, Andrew Steele, Ruth Ben-Ghiat, Steven Levitsky, David Corn, and Carl Bernstein among the various scheduled for Wednesday, May 4.   Registration/tickets information
 

05/04/2022 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company.
Jennifer Natalya Fink with Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company.
The author of six quite varied books, most recently the FC2 Catherine Doctorow Innovative Fiction Prize for Bhopal Dance, and the director of the Program in Disability Studies and professor of English at Georgetown, Jennifer Natalya Fink makes this virtual Elliott Bay appearance for her new non-fiction work, All Our Families: Disability Lineage and the Future of Kinship (Beacon Press). “Jennifer Natalya Fink’s All Our Families is a magisterial crip-queer reimagining of our disabled pasts and futures. It is the most thorough and engaging consideration of disability lineage and disability kinship available. Grounded in cutting-edge crip thought on disability justice and care work, All Our Families provides a definitive mapping of transformative modes of disability relationality and solidarity.”—Robert McRuer. “Fink melds an accessible extended family narrative with a complex and wide-ranging survey of how ableism—intersecting with notions of race, class, gender, the family, the state, and purity—functions to otherize, dehumanize, and hide or erase disabled people. All Our Families offers a deep, reflective, and urgent call to enact a care ethic and also to reframe our identities, lineages, and relationships around notions of disabled kinship.”—Sonya Huber. Jennifer Natalya Fink will have good company in conversation with her tonight as esteemed Seattle writer Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore, author most recently of The Freezer Door and also editor of Between Certain Death and a Possible Future: Queer Writing on Growing Up with the AIDS Crisis.   Registration/information  
 

05/04/2022 - 7:00pm

Hugo House
Kathryn Schulz with Claire Dederer
Hugo House
1634 11th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
In Lost & Found: A Memoir (Random House), New Yorker writer Kathryn Schulz, author of the well-received On Being Wrong, and even better known in these parts for her Pulitzer Prize-winning piece, ‘The Really Big One,’ on the earthquake due here, has written a beautiful and remarkable book, touching at once on life’s smallest & biggest elements. How we lose & get lost, from the most mundane to the most profound, & similarly, with what we find, & with what finds us, she writes with stunning insight and concision. The ampersand (&) also gets its due, as readers who’ve been finding their way to this book since its release early this year have known. We’re delighted to now be helping present her in person, should all go to plan. “Kathryn Schulz has a singular way of turning a familiar idea around and around until it becomes cosmic, geological, wondrous. In Lost & Found she turns a memoir of love and death into an exploration of the way chance becomes fate and grief intertwines with gratitude. To read her is to be quietly amazed at hidden depths and histories—as if you were to discover a map of a continent written in the palm of your hand.”—Jia Tolentino. “An extraordinary gift of a book, a tender, searching meditation on love and loss and what it means to be human. I wept at it, laughed with it, was entirely fascinated by it. I emerged feeling as if the world around me had been made anew.”—Helen Macdonald. Making what should be a memorable evening even more so will be Seattle writer Claire Dederer’s being on hand in conversation. She is the author of Love and Trouble and Poser. Co-presented by Elliott Bay Book Company and Hugo House.   Free registration/information    
 

05/05/2022 - 11:00am to 8:00pm

Virtual Event
Crosscut Festival Virtual Program
Virtual Event
The Crosscut Festival, annually devoted to discussions and presentations of subjects including public affairs, politics, journalism, social justice, technology, the environment, and more, over a series of days and evenings.  Programs, in-person (on Saturday, May 7) and virtual, May 4-6, continue today with virtual programs featuring Tim Fernholz, Laurie Santos, Robert Gibbs, Rick Wilson, Anthony Fauci, and Judy Woodruff  among the various scheduled for Thursday, May 5.  Featured books for Crosscut presenters maybe ordered here   https://www.elliottbaybook.com/store/catalog/crosscut-festival/crosscut-featured-authors   Registration/tickets information  
 

05/06/2022 - 9:00am to 4:00pm

Virtual Event
Crosscut Festival Virtual Program
Virtual Event
The Crosscut Festival, annually devoted to discussions and presentations of subjects including public affairs, politics, journalism, social justice, technology, the environment, and more, over a series of days and evenings.  Programs, in-person (on Saturday, May 7) and virtual, May 4-6, continue today with virtual programs featuring Eyal Press, Sarah Jaffe, Bill McKibben, Alison Schrager, Robert Doar, and Owen Cass among the various scheduled for Friday, May 6.   Registration/tickets information  
 

05/07/2022 - 10:00am to 9:00pm

Live & In-Person
Crosscut Festival In-Person Program
Live & In-Person
The Crosscut Festival, annually devoted to discussions and presentations of subjects including public affairs, politics, journalism, social justice, technology, the environment, and more, happens over a series of days and evenings.  Programs, in-person, on Saturday, May 7, happen at Seattle University with the first announced session at 10:00 AM and the last starting at 2:45 PM. Among those expected in panels and presentations are Jay Inslee, Bill Radke, Edward Benote ‘Eddie’ Hill, Robert Pearlberg, Kate Yoder, Bob Ferguson, Essex Porter, Pamela Paul, Knute Berger, Helene Neville, Alyssa Macy, Marc Dones, Karen E. Salinas, Josh Cohen, Bruce Harrell, Lynne Robinson, Victoria R. Woodards, Ann Davison, Vin Gupta, Cassie Sauer, Will Stone, Chris Reykdal, Uti Yamassee Hawkins, and Donna Gordon Blankinship.   Registration/tickets information    
 

05/07/2022 - 7:30pm

Live & in-person at Town Hall Seattle
Nikole Hannah-Jones with Christopher Sebastian Parke
Live & in-person at Town Hall Seattle
1119 Eighth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98101
The 2022 Crosscut Festival concludes with this keynote program at Town Hall Seattle featuring Nikole Hannah-Jones, who as a Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times journalist helped orchestrate the New York Times Magazine issue devoted to 1619 - and what would become, in 2021, the bestselling, landmark book, The 1619 Project: A New Origin Story (One World). Presently the Knight Chair in Race and Journalism at Howard University, where she has also founded the Center for Journalism and Democracy, Nikole Hannah-Jones will be in conversation here at Town Hall this evening with University of Washington professor of political science Christopher Sebastian Parker, author most recently of Change They Can’t Believe In: The Tea Party and Reactionary Politics in America. Presented by the Crosscut Festival. Elliott Bay Book Company will be present with books for sale.   Tickets/more information
 
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05/08/2022 - 7:30pm

Benaroya Hall, Taper Foundation Auditorium
An Evening of Yotam Ottolenghi with Bethany Jean Clement
Benaroya Hall, Taper Foundation Auditorium
200 University Street
Seattle, WA 98101
One week after presenting Neal Gaiman, NWAA is at it again, this time co-presenting with Seattle Neighborhood Farmers Markets in presenting revered London-based chef, restaurateur, and author Yotam Ottolenghi. His books (some co-authored) include Ottolenghi, Jerusalem, Plenty, Plenty More, Nopi. Sweet, Ottolenghi Simple, Ottolenghi Flavor, and 2021’s Ottolenghi Test Kitchen: Shelf Love (Clarkson Potter). “With Jerusalem and all the books that followed, Yotam Ottolenghi changed everything about what we cook and crave.” -Dorie Greenspan.  Seattle Times food writer Bethany Jean Clement will be onstage as host and in conversation with Yotam Ottolenghi.  This event does not include a booksigning, but pre-signed books will be available for purchase.    Presented  by NWAA, Seattle Neighborhood Farmers Markets, KNKX 88.5fm & The Stranger. Elliott Bay Book Company will be on hand with books for sale, including (it is hoped) pres-signed copies.   Tickets/information
 

05/09/2022 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Jokha Alharthi with Rick Simonson
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
We are thrilled to be able to virtually present this reading and conversation program with Man Booker International Prize-winning novelist Jokha Alharthi . The first Omani woman writer to have her work translated into English, she is the author of four novels, three collections of stories, and three children’s books in Arabic. It was Marilyn Booth’s translation of her novel Celestial Bodies that received the 2019 Man Booker International Prize. She is also a professor at Sultan Qaboos University in Muscat. This evening is occasioned by Marilyn Booth’s translation of Narinjah, or Bitter Orange Tree (Catapult), a much-anticipated story of a young Omani woman leaving the bounds of home for university in Britain. "Bitter Orange Tree blazes with the strength of generations of Omani women—from the charcoal makers of the Arab gulf to the international students of a British residence hall. This mesmerizing novel is an illuminating, important work and Jokha Alharthi points her pen at some of the most harrowing circumstances facing women and girls across the world. I am grateful to Marilyn Booth for her translation of this exquisite book.” —Kali Fajardo-Anstine. "Jokha Alharthi is a remarkable writer for whom my admiration grows with each work. Watching the lives of Zuhour and Bint Amir unfurl within Bitter Orange Tree was a pleasure, and Alharthi's prose in the capable hands of translator Marilyn Booth is as clear and refreshing as a cool glass of water." —Sara Nović.   Registration/information  
 

05/10/2022 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company.
Gregory D. Smithers
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company.
A scholar whose work has largely focused on Cherokee and Southeastern North American Indigenous history, based both at Virginia Commonwealth University and the University of Hull in England, Gregory D. Smithers virtually joins us to discuss his important new book, Reclaiming Two-Spirits: Sexuality, Spiritual Renewal, & Sovereignty in Native America (Beacon Press). “From the onset of colonization until well into the present, the discourse and histories of Two-Spirit Indigenous peoples remains a puzzle for Indigenous and non-Indigenous people alike. Reclaiming Two-Spirits will help you solve that puzzle. Using familiar and obscure stories, Smithers skillfully reveals the centrality of Two-Spirit struggles within the matrix of settler colonial domination and the Indigenous struggle for freedom. He reveals the destructive nature of colonial violence and the possibilities of a Two-Spirit future. An original contribution to Indigenous cultural and intellectual histories, an understanding of the links between language and power, and Indigenous futures, this book will not only educate your mind, but will also touch your spirit.”—Kyle T. Mays (Black/Saginaw Chippewa).  “Smithers’s Reclaiming Two-Spirits compels readers to rethink gender and sexuality from the nonbinary point of view of Indigenous cultures, which uses gender-neutral and polyvalent words to express an array of identities. Smithers recovers the Two-Spirits who lie hidden beneath the homophobic language of archival records, obliging not only historians but everyone who cares about Indigenous peoples to be more aware of gender biases and how language is a tool of colonization.”—David Martínez (Akimel O’odham/Hia Ced O’odham/Mexican).   Registration/information  
 

05/11/2022 - 6:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Masatsugu Ono
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Making this welcome, in-person (it is planned) Elliott Bay return this evening is prize-winning Japanese novelist and translator Masatsugu Ono. The author of novels that have received the Asahi, Mishima and Akutagawa Prizes, the latter being Japan’s most prestigious, and a noted translator of French writing into Japanese, Masatsugu Ono was here for a memorably delightful visit for one of his earlier translated novels, Lion Cross Point. He is here tonight for Juliet Winters Carpenter’s translation of his novel, At the Edge of the Woods (Two Lines Press). “At the Edge of the Woods balances wonder and disquiet with incomparable grace and precision; in this novel about a family navigating their unsteady future, Masatsugu Ono illustrates modern life’s horrors alongside the wonder of the unknown. Ono is one of our great chroniclers of love, with all of its possibility and dread, and the worlds this novel inhabits are both unsettling and awe-inspiring. At the Edge of the Woods is beautiful and seductive. Ono continues to captivate.” —Bryan Washington. “This book. I have never read anything quite like it. Think The Turn of the Screw meets Signs Preceding the End of the World. Ono, translated by Juliet Winters Carpenter, is an exquisite writer.” —Rachel Swearingen. Registration for this event is optional.   Registration/information   
 

05/11/2022 - 7:30pm

Town Hall
Francis Fukuyama with Eric Liu
Town Hall
1119 Eighth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98101
Up from Stanford where he is the Olivier Nomellini Senior Fellow at Stanford University’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies is Francis Fukuyama. The author of such books as The End of History and the Last Man, Trust, and America at the Crossroads, he will be discussing his newest work, Liberalism and Its Discontents (Farrar, Straus & Giroux) here at Town Hall this evening.  "An eloquent and eminently sensible defense of liberal freedom and pluralism that should be read and debated by leaders and activists across the ideological spectrum. This clearly written and concisely argued book highlights Fukuyama’s lifelong examination of the political theories and systems that shape human history—and in turn get shaped by its developments.” —John Halpin, Washington Monthly "Urgent and timely . . . A vital strength of this slim, elegant book is that it is crystalline in its definitions, even while acknowledging the complexities of practice . . . A brilliantly acute summary of the way some aspects of liberal thought have consumed themselves." —Andrew Anthony, The Guardian. With Francis Fukuyama in conversation this evening will be Seattle’s Eric Liu, co-founder and CEO of Citizen University, and author of such books as The Accidental Asian, The Gardens of Democracy (with Nick Hanauer), and Become America. Presented by Town Hall Civics in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company.   Tickets/information    
 

05/12/2022 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Nghi Vo
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
*This is now a virtual event, hosted by the Elliott Bay Company as a Zoom Webinar! Our May was almost all set when things suddenly ‘developed’ as we may say of these times where plans and possibilities may alter and adjust on quickened notice. So it is with this planned in-person visit by the brilliant and wonderful novelist Nghi Vo, whose novel The Chosen and the Beautiful and whose novellas When the Tiger Came Down the Mountain and The Empress of Salt and Fortune have dazzled and beguiled. The recipient of Crawford and Hugo Awards,  she is here this evening with her newest novel, Siren Queen (Tordotcom). “In this stellar novel, Vo turns Hollywood into a fairyland—the kind from the old stories, sharp and dangerous—and laces the sparkling silver romance of the movies with a dark, exploitative, hungry greed. . . . Pair that vivid world with the stubborn, passionate Luli and a pace that turns from slow and delightfully sexy to vast and terrifying with the turn of a page and you have the brilliantly searing Siren Queen.”—Booklist. “Nghi Vo has become one of my favorite writers, and Siren Queen is lush and brilliant, a mesmerizing journey into a pre-code Hollywood that is all sharp edges, with the darkest magic and highest stakes.”—Martha Wells.   Registration/information    
 

05/12/2022 - 7:00pm

Folio: The Seattle Athenaeum
Marcia DeSanctis & Erin Byrne
Folio: The Seattle Athenaeum
93 Pike St, #307
Seattle, WA 98101
Journalist, essayist, and author Marcia DeSanctis chronicles a good part of forty years of travel all over the world in her engaging new book, A Hard Place to Leave: Stories from a Restless Life (Traveler’s Tales). From a Moscow hotel in 1983 to somewhere out in West Texas in 2020, there is a lot of ground (and sky and sea) covered here.  “These probing, achingly beautiful essays form an indelible portrait of a life. Who is this woman with her many, at times contradictory, facets? She is an adventurer, journalist, wife, mother, daughter, her world set spinning by the brilliance of her mind, the tenacity of her love for her family, and the intensity of her longing to be anywhere but here. Through the very act of interrogating her own restlessness, Marcia DeSanctis provides us with a tantalizing window into a rich and singular world.” —Dani Shapiro “Marcia DeSanctis’s A Hard Place to Leave is perfumed with lush, luminous language as she sweeps us all across the globe. From Moscow to Cape Town, quiet New England to Sweden, these tender portraits grow on us like a spring garden.” —Aimee Nezhukumatathil Erin Byrne is the author of Wings: Gifts of Art, Life, and Travel in France, editor of Vignettes & Postcards from Paris and Vignettes & Postcards from Morocco, and writer of The Storykeeper film. Presented live and in-person by Folio: The Seattle Athenaeum. Elliott Bay will be on hand with copies of A Hard Place to Leave for sale.   Tickets/information    
 

05/13/2022 - 6:00pm

Virtually hosted The Elliott Bay Book Company
Caitlin Scarano & Ada Limón
Virtually hosted The Elliott Bay Book Company
A great pairing this should be as two poets with affinity and regard for each other’s work, both read from their newest books. With Bellingham poet Caitlin Scarano, it is a collection of poems, The Necessity of Wildfire (Blair), chosen by none other than prize judge Ada Limón for the Wren Poetry Prize. “In Caitlin Scarano’s stunning collection The Necessity of Wildfire, we look directly at a world that has been harmed and try to understand how we survive. Evocative, meaningful, musical, and fierce, these poems are unwavering in their consideration of loss, grief, generational trauma, and the violence of personal histories and in the natural world.” - Kelli Russell Agodon.  “Hungry, clear-eyed, tough, and generous, The Necessity of Wildfire, is a book that creates a humming musicality out of the early sorrows and rough stones of life. Cinematic and sound-driven, these are brilliant and honest personal poems that open up to the larger universal truths. These poems are gorgeous and complex.”—Ada Limón. As for Ada Limón herself, her sixth collection, The Hurting Kind (Milkweed Editions), coming in the wake of her National Book Critics Circle book, The Carrying, is one of this year’s most anticipated new books of poetry. For good reason. “The tender, arresting sixth collection from Limón is an ode to the cycle of birth, death, and rebirth that characterizes the natural world . . . Limón’s crystalline language is a feast for the senses, bringing monumental significance to the minuscule and revealing life in every blade of grass.”—Publishers Weekly. “In The Hurting Kind, [Limón] touches on the pain of living in the world today (the wounds of the natural world, the pandemic between us), but it is not all sorrows . . . You don’t have to look hard to see the joy and the small celebrations of the things that bind us to one another. The Hurting Kind is a book composed of our connective tissue.”—Literary Hub. Registration/information  
 
 
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05/16/2022 - 7:00pm

Seattle Central Public Library
Putsata Reang with Susan Lieu
Seattle Central Public Library
1000 Fourth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98104
We are excited beyond words to be helping, with our friends at The Seattle Public Library, and other community cohorts, to be helping celebrate the publication of Seattle journalist Putsata Reang’s magnificent Ma and Me: A Memoir (MCD/Farrar, Straus & Giroux) at Seattle Central Public Library this evening. This brilliant, searching, telling book of coming of age, growing into adult life as a child who is herself a refugee from Cambodia and strife there, who is very much part of a family and culture, yet caught in the dynamics of change, distance, adaptation, and adherence to customs and patterns there have been in life. The part of hard work, application, connecting here and in Cambodia with past and present, all the while being part of a family, becoming a part of things in the US, schooling, working - and Putsata Reangs’s own coming to know herself being queer - what that means within her family, and for her life: these are just some of what Putata Reang brilliantly limns in this heart-making book. “A book as close to perfect as any I have read in many years. Lyrical, emotional, and profoundly moving, Ma and Me is in equal parts a love story between a mother and her daughter, and a family’s tale of survival, war, and the inherited traumas. I read Ma and Me in two days, and that is only because I forced myself to slow down to savor Putsata Reang’s sharp, poetic prose.”—Loung Ung. “At a time when there are more refugees than ever in history, and borders are places of violence and cruelty, two essential stories of our time converge in Ma and Me: Americanization’s multigenerational costs, and the way this converges with lesbian life. Putsata Reang expands both literatures with this openhearted memoir that grapples emotionally and historically with the profound consequences of displacement on future lives and relationships. A book that opens the door to include queer descendants of war survivors into the growing American library of love.”—Sarah Schulman. Joining the program this evening with Putsata Reang will be Vietnamese-American Seattle playwright, performer, and producer Susan Lieu, who herself has a memoir coming from Celadon Books in early 2023. This ive/in-person program, with streaming in addition, at Seattle Central Public Library is co-presented by The Seattle Public Library and Elliott Bay Book Company, in partnership with Hedgebrook and Friends of Little Saigon.   Free registration/information  
 

05/17/2022 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Toni Bentley with Peter Boal and Silas Farley
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
For a decade, from the time she was seventeen, Toni Bentley was a dancer with George Balanchine’s New York City Ballet, dancing in central, prominent roles throughout that time. In her new book, Serenade: A Balanchine Story (Pantheon), she writes of that singular masterwork of his, what it was to dance and work with Balanchine in its staging, which included seventeen female dancers doing demanding, turn-on-a-dime precision work. “A beautiful read about one of the greatest ballets ever created. A unique document, propulsive and rich in substance. Balanchine’s image emerges powerfully, in wonderful detail. Personal, authentic, and revealing about what it took to be one of his dancers.” —Mikhail Baryshnikov. “Toni Bentley’s Serenade is in a category all its own—at once an ode to the rigor and passion necessary to create great art and a pointillist description of its making. It is also the story of the embracing yet exacting Balanchine, lending his genius to a young woman’s life. It will consume anyone interested in the generative force that comes from the devoted pursuit of a vocation; you needn’t know the difference between a tendu and an arabesque, a prima ballerina and a member of the corps, to be captured by its poetic prose and ingenious structure. This is a transporting reading experience, written with fervor and discernment, and a moving testament to the possibilities that lie within each of us.” —Daphne Merkin. In addition to her dance career, Toni Bentley has over the years become a writer of note, her books including Winter Season, Holding On to the Air (with Suzanne Farrell), and The Surrender: An Erotic Memoir.  Joining in virtual conversation this evening will be Peter Boal, artistic director of Pacific Northwest Ballet, and in earlier years, himself a dancer with New York City Ballet. Also virtually on hand will be Silas Farley, Dean of the Trudl Zipper Dance Institute at The Colburn School in Los Angeles, and from 2012-2020 a dancer with New York City Ballet. This should be enlivening, to say the least. Co-presented with promotional support from the Pacific Northwest Ballet.   Registration/information  
 

05/17/2022 - 7:00pm

Seattle Central Public Library
Angela Garbes with Melissa Miranda
Seattle Central Public Library
1000 Fourth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98104
Seattle’s Angela Garbes, she of onetime working at Elliott Bay, of writing for The Stranger and other publications, who has been borne into the book world and then some with her debut book, Like a Mother, now looks at larger ramifications of what motherhood and mothering are - social, cultural, political, economic, personal,  and more - in her brilliant new book, Essential Labor: Mothering as Social Change (Harper Wave). "I have never felt more held, challenged, and called to action by a book. Angela Garbes seamlessly weaves together memoir, research, and cultural analysis in a way that is expansive and profoundly intimate. She offers a path forward for family life that is simultaneously instinctive, generous, and revolutionary, sounding a note that American society badly needs to hear. I know I will think about this book for the rest of my life—it's that important." -Lydia Kiesling.  “Angela Garbes has given us the definitive explanation for something we all share: the sense that something is not right about our society’s treatment of parenting. Essential Labor is a beautifully written, painstakingly researched, and courageously personal book. Garbes reveals the way systems exploit caregiving and shows us how the essential work of mothering can fix not just family life, but society. A timely and unforgettable book.” -Heather McGhee. Onstage in conversation with Angela Garbes this evening will be Melissa Miranda, chef/owner of Musang, a heralded Filipina restaurant that opened on Seattle’s Beacon Hill in January 2020. This live/in-person program, with streaming available, is co-presented by The Seattle Public Library and Elliott Bay Book Company.   Free registration/information
 

05/18/2022 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Rachel M. Harper with Rebecca Walker 
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Making this welcome virtual appearance from her Los Angeles home will be novelist Rachel M. Harper, here with a brilliant fictional exploration of the contemporary American family in at least some of its present manifestations with her novel, The Other Mother (Counterpoint). “A riveting, suspenseful, tender, kaleidoscopic rewriting of the American family—formed as much by blood and memory as by desire, will, and even deception. In Rachel M. Harper's masterful hands, ideas of family are exploded and put back together in an epic story as compelling as it is necessary. Harper has written a modern American saga that defines what we are and who we might become. This is an exquisite novel.” —Danzy Senna. "A sprawling, multigenerational portrait of a mixed-race family that begins with a man's quest to uncover the truth of his origins . . . Harper has created a novel about longing, loss, kinship, talent, queerness, and what makes a family . . . A novel about the families we inherit and the ones we make for ourselves." —Kirkus Reviews. “The Other Mother breaks every rule of traditional world-building and creates the kind of full-hearted literary saga we are lucky to get once every generation. Dazzling.” —Kiese Laymon. Rachel M. Harper is also the author of the novels Brass Ankle Blues and This Side of Providence.    Registration/information    
 

05/19/2022 - 9:30am to 12:30pm

Temple De Hirsch
Dara Horn
Temple De Hirsch
1511 E. Pike St.
Seattle, WA 98122
The Clergy Institute, Temple De Hirsch Sinai’s annual opportunity for interfaith study and discourse, is made possible through the generous support of The Alfred and Tillie Shemanski Trust, the family of Mila and Henry Eisenhardt, and Seattle University. This year’s program features Dr. Dara Horn as the 2022 Clergy Institute scholar. Her recent book of essays People Love Dead Jews: Reports from a Haunted Present (W.W. Norton), won the 2021 National Jewish Book Award for Con­tem­po­rary Jew­ish Life and Prac­tice, and was a finalist for the 2021 Kirkus Prize in Nonfiction. “People Love Dead Jews is, of all things, a deeply entertaining book, from its whopper of a title on… Horn is a masterful essayist… She has the instincts of a stand-up comic with something deadly serious on her mind.” — Tablet Magazine “Brilliantly readable… Readers will be enthralled throughout by the fierce logic of Horn’s arguments, novelty of research, black humor, and sharp phrasing… A riveting, radical, essential revision of the stories we all know — and some we don’t.” - Kirkus Reviews Presented by Temple De Hirsch Sinai Seattle. This public program requires pre-registration. Tickets ($18) include breakfast, lunch and a Q&A with the author. Books will be available for purchase.    Tickets/information   
 

05/19/2022 - 7:00pm

Seattle Central Public Library
Claudia Castro Luna with Leticia Hernández-Linares
Seattle Central Public Library
1000 Fourth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98104
The publication of beloved Seattle poet Claudia Castro Luna’s marvelous new collection of poetry, Cipota Under the Moon (Tia Chucha Press) is celebrated this evening at Seattle Central Library. In this powerful, lyrical, charged new book, the inaugural Seattle Civic Poet and recent Washington State Poet Laureate, writes vividly with the perspective of both the everyday and personal, familial, and the longer arcs of history, civil war in her native El Salvador, strife, and immigration. In various poetic forms, and sometimes in languages more than one, she does this with vision, compassion, a keen eye for the larger and smaller, what is human, and what is beyond the human. “Castro Luna moves between litany and lamentation with a memorable grace.” —Tod Marshall. “Claudia Castro Luna’s stunning book of poems, Cipota Under the Moon, is one of re-remembering and reckoning. Poems arch back to a Salvadoran childhood and adolescence marked by blossoming, coming-into-being beauty – and wrenching, shattering terror – the two often intertwined, and come forward to a present decades later, palpable aftershocks of trauma and forced displacement still being lived. This book bravely meets those aftershocks, an intimate poetic voice recalling and realizing, violence and cruelty, with fierce tenderness. What Amy Hempel, paraphrasing an Arab proverb says: ‘When danger approaches, sing to it.’ With radiant voice, this book sings – to it all.” - Rick Simonson.  Helping host this evening, and hopefully doing some reading herself, poet, educator, and also of Salvadoran heritage Leticia Hernández-Linares. A professor of Ethnic Studies at San Francisco State University, her work includes the poetry collection, Mucha Muchacha, and the edited anthology, The Wandering Song: Central American Writing in the United States. This event will be presented live/in-person, with streaming as well, and is co-presented by The Seattle Public Library and Elliott Bay Book Company.   Registration/information  
 

05/20/2022 - 6:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Peter Heller
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
We are delighted to welcome back, in real-life if all holds to plan a writer we remember from his non-fiction writing days, who has become one of the more well-received novelists of his generation, Peter Heller. Author of such popular works as The Dog Stars, The River, Celine, The Painter, and Hell or High Water, he is here for the just-released paperback of last year’s The Guide (Vintage).  “Heller presents another brilliantly paced, unnerving wilderness thriller paired with an absorbing depiction of a remote natural paradise. … Masterful evocations of nature are not surprising, given Heller’s award-winning nonfiction about his own outdoor experiences, while his ability to inject shocking menace into a novel that might otherwise serve as a lyrical paean to nature is remarkable.”—Booklist “Heller’s lush descriptions of fishing and river country are matched with a riveting, surprising mystery that captures the difference between the filthy rich and everyone else. The novel’s speculative approach to the lingering effects of Covid-19 is frightening in its subtlety and one of the book’s special charms. Readers looking for a credible couple and a story of redemption will love this.”—Publishers Weekly “Peter Heller is the poet laureate of the literary thriller.” —Michael Koryta. Registration for this event is optional.   Registration/information    
 

05/20/2022 - 7:00pm

Hugo House
Hugo Literary Series: Viet Thanh Nguyen, Gabrielle Calvocoressi, Stacy D. Flood
Hugo House
1634 11th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
Hugo House’s May run of the 2022 Hugo Literary Series concludes this evening with the apt theme of ‘The Time Tripper’ as ‘prompt’ for newly created work responding to the notion. On hand tonight will be Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Viet Thanh Nguyen, author of The Sympathizer, The Refugees, Nothing Ever Dies, Chicken of the Sea (where last we saw him in-person, January 2020, with co-author/son Ellison), and, most recently, The Committed. Audre Lorde Award-winning poet Gabrielle Calvocoressi is the author of The Last Time I Saw Amelia Earhart, Apocalyptic Swing, and Rocket Fantastic.  Stacy D. Flood is author of the brilliant novella, The Salt Fields, whose publication we helped celebrate. That said, it will be a night of Time Trapping, everyone with work to the occasion. Presented by Hugo House.   Tickets/information  
 

05/21/2022 - 1:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Harry Harootunian
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
In the 1910s, historian Harry Harootunian's parents Ohannes and Vehanush escaped the mass slaughter of the Armenian genocide, making their way to France, where they first met, before settling in suburban Detroit. Although his parents rarely spoke of their families and the horrors they survived, the genocide and their parents' silence about it was a permanent backdrop to the Harootunian children's upbringing. In The Unspoken as Heritage: The Armenian Genocide (Duke University Press)​​​​, Harootunian, for the first time in his distinguished career-turns to his personal life and family heritage to explore the genocide's multigenerational afterlives that remain at the heart of the Armenian diaspora. Today Dr. Hartootunian, known for his decades of scholarship in East Asian Studies, discusses this most personal book.  Harry Harootunian is Max Palevsky Professor of History Emeritus at the University of Chicago; professor emeritus of East Asian studies at New York University; and the author of numerous books, most recently, Uneven Moments: Reflections on Japan's Modern History. Presented with promotional support provided by the Simpson Center for the Humanities at the University of Washington. Special thanks to the Japan and East Asian Studies Department at the University of Washington.   Registration/infortmation    
 
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05/22/2022 - 2:00pm

Town Hall
Donna Sandstrom
Town Hall
1119 Eighth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98101
In Orca Rescue! The True Story of An Orphaned Orca Named Springer (Kids Can Press), writer Donna Sandstrom and illustrator Sarah Burwash tell the lively story, the life-saving story, of the only successful orca rescue and reunion in history - which she participated in. Now she writes and tells the story. Her work on and for whales and their place in this part of the world has also been evident with her work at establishing The Whale Trail, familiar postings of information along the Salish Sea’s waters. This should be fun - and illuminating! Co-presented by Town Hall Seattle and KNKX.   Tickets/information    
 

05/23/2022 - 6:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Tsering Yangzom Lama with Kim Fu
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
A story that would readerly appeal for the subject matter alone - the story of a Tibetan family living through the trauma of exile and diaspora that many Tibetan refugees and families have had to endure the past half-century and more - but that attains a whole other level with the compelling power,  beauty and artistry of the writing by Tsering Yangzom Lama with her extraordinary first novel, We Measure the Earth With Our Bodies (Bloomsbury). Tsering Yangzom Lama was born and raised in Nepal, and has lived in recent years in Vancouver, Toronto, and New York City. She has really done it with this novel, taken the measure of what life and hold and be. “This symphonic novel sweeps like a long wave to its transcendent, devastating conclusion. A story about the violence of exile, but also about the bright threads of love that tie these characters to their culture, their ancestral land, and each other: an intelligent, adaptable love that offers them their survival. Sentence by sentence, Lama builds an unforgettable world, sharpened by the force of her characters' longing. You must hand your heart over to this astonishing novel-it will be better for the breaking.” ―Shruti Swamy  “We Measure the Earth with Our Bodies showcases a writer of rare talent and uncompromising vision. In these pages that speak of exile and loss, of longing and sorrow, Tsering Lama also manages to remind us – with startling beauty and compassion – how much can still survive. This novel is a testament to a people's resolve to love, no matter what. A triumph.” ―Maaza Mengiste Tsering Yangzom Lama will be appearing in conversation with Seattle novelist Kim Fu, whose books include The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore and, most recently,  Known Monsters of the 21st Century: Stories. Registration for this event is optional.   Registration/information    
 

05/24/2022 - 6:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Nathan Harris
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
As things begin to open up again one heartening development has been publishers paying more attention to paperback releases than they have sometimes been known to, for stellar works that weren’t able to get full attention when the hardcover was released. So it is with Nathan Harris and his brilliant debut novel, The Sweetness of Water (new in paper, Little, Brown). Make no mistake, this book did receive attention. It was an Oprah’s Book Club Pick, it won the Ernest J. Gaines Award, was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize, the Carnegie Medal, and the Center for Fiction First Novel Prize. “Harris’s debut novel is remarkable; that he’s only 29 is miraculous. His prose is burnished with an antique patina that evokes the mid-19th century. And he explores this liminal moment in our history with extraordinary sensitivity to the range of responses from Black and White Americans contending with a revolutionary ideal of personhood... All of this is drawn with gorgeous fidelity to these cautious characters, struggling to remake the world, or at least this little patch of it... Harris stacks the timbers of this plot deliberately, and the moment a spark alights, the whole structure begins to burn hot... What’s most impressive about Harris’s novel is how he attends to the lives of these peculiar people while capturing the tectonic tensions at play in the American South.”—Ron Charles, Washington Post “Deeply moving… Harris’s ambitious debut explores the aftermath of the Emancipation Proclamation in rural Georgia… Harris peoples the small community with well-developed characters… [He] writes in intelligent, down-to-earth prose and shows a keen understanding of his characters.”—Publishers Weekly A year it’s taken for Nathan Harris to get here - a wait we sense will be worth it for all concerned, with this masterful first book. Registration for this event is optional.   Registration/information    
 

05/25/2022 - 8:00pm

Paramount Theatre
Rupi Kaur
Paramount Theatre
911 Pine St
Seattle, WA 98101
Rupi Kaur brings her World Tour to Seattle and the Paramount this evening as the celebrated poet, artist, and performer makes a welcome return to Seattle. She has lit up the poetry world and beyond with her three collections of poetry and her galvanizing role in bringing more people to poetry, and more poetry from others as well as herself to more people. Her three collections, milk and honey, the sun and her flowers, and home body (Andrews McMeel) have been huge bestsellers all.  Elliott Bay will be on hand with books, with it expected that we’ll have a supply of signed bookplates to go with books that are purchased here this evening.  Presented by STG and AEG.   Tickets/information      
 

05/26/2022 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Rebekah Anderson & Michael Daley
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Two fiction debuts by stellar Pacific Northwest writers - one of them quite new at books and publishing, the other quite seasoned, although this novel a first -  get celebrated this evening with this joint virtual reading. Seattle writer Rebekah Anderson draws on her family’s generations-long presence in eastern Washington as background for her excellent, historically-set  debut novel, The Grand Promise (Empty Bowl). “Rebekah Anderson imagines the repercussions of building the Grand Coulee Dam for riverside communities riven by prejudice, need and hope. To make it through The Great Depression, her characters destroy, scavenge and rebuild to salvage their homes and self-images. A most American story of survival and self advancement in the name of questionable progress, The Grand Promise posits questions about prosperity whose answers are playing out in real time. Amidst shanty towns of a Pacific Northwest more akin to modern times than most people want to believe, each generation raises the stakes for the next.”  — Kristen Millares Young “Rebekah Anderson’s wonderful debut novel The Grand Promise is a roiling, remarkably ambitious saga exploring the lives of a complex array of characters forever altered by the construction of the largest dam in North America—the Grand Coulee on the Columbia River. Deeply researched, the book evokes with remarkable specificity these ordinary and extraordinary people living in rural Washington in the late 1930s, as they’re pushed and pulled by this outrageously ambitious project, their lives swept up and overturned by the forces of history.” — Peter Mountford Then there is Michael Daley, poet/author of such collections over the decades as The Straits, Moonlight in the Redemptive Forest, Of a Feather, Born With, and Reinhabited: New & Selected Poems, also translations. The founding editor of Empty Bowl, and a key literary conjurer of community and support for other poets and writers, he’ll be reading from what we believe is his first novel, Telémachus (Pleasure Boat Studio). “Father: Famous poet and vicious critic of contemporary poetry and politics found dead, seated on a subway platform bench. Son: Famous painter of miniature, imaginary landscapes seeks the secrets behind his estranged father’s personal and professional demise. The Chorus: Letters and texts from father’s friends sing us through the convoluted Archipelago of these distinctly contemporary lives. Climb aboard the Telémachus, secrets await! Michael Daley raises the bar on father-son tales.” –Bill Ransom.    Registration/information    
 
 
 
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05/31/2022 - 6:00pm

The Elliott Bay Book Company
Julie Phillips
The Elliott Bay Book Company
1521 Tenth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98122
What does a great artist who is also a mother look like? What does it mean to create, not in “a room of one’s own,” but in a domestic space? In The Baby on the Fire Escape: Creativity, Motherhood and the Mind-Baby Problem (WW Norton), award-winning biographer Julie Phillips traverses the shifting terrain where motherhood and creativity converge. She travels to Seattle from her home in Amsterdam to speak about her book, in which she explores the intimate and varied struggles of brilliant artists and writers of the twentieth century. Ursula K. Le Guin found productive stability in family life, and Audre Lorde’s queer, polyamorous union allowed her to raise children on her own terms. Susan Sontag became a mother at nineteen, Angela Carter at forty-three. As Julie Phillips threads together vivid portraits of these (and other) pathbreaking women, she argues that creative motherhood is a question of keeping the baby on that apocryphal fire escape: work and care held in a constantly renegotiated, provisional, productive tension. A meditation on maternal identity and artistic greatness, The Baby on the Fire Escape illuminates some of the most pressing conflicts in contemporary life. “Before I met Ursula K. Le Guin, I had no personal models for how a woman with children might also be a writer. What I did have was the children. Here, with her customary clarity, with empathy, nuance, and acuity, Julie Phillips questions some of our most admired artists about the ways in which the creativity required by motherhood and the creativity required by art have thwarted and supported them.” —Karen Joy Fowler, author of Booth and We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves Julie Phillips,  American biographer and book critic is also the author of James Tiptree, Jr.: The Double Life of Alice B. Sheldon, which received several honors including the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Hugo and Locus Awards, as we;; as  the Washington State Book Award. She is  working on a biography of Ursula K. Le Guin. Registration for this event is optional.   Registration/information   
 
 
 
 
 
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