May 2021

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05/01/2021 - 11:00am

Virtually hosted by Red May
Red May
Virtually hosted by Red May
Check out the schedule for events all month long!   Full schedule  
 
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05/02/2021 - 2:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Danielle Sered with Nikkita Oliver
Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Originally scheduled a year ago, to the best of our recollection, this program featuring restorative justice activist Danielle Sered, in conversation with Seattle creative, community organizer, abolitionist, educator, and attorney Nikkita Oliver, was originally scheduled but then scuttled as most everything was with the onset of the pandemic. The subjects Danielle Sered addresses in her book, Until We Reckon: Violence, Mass Incarceration, and a Road to Repair (The New Press) are no less timely than when this book first appeared. “Danielle Sered provocatively offers and backs up a vision that actually promotes real healing for crime survivors and improves community safety. A must-read for anyone who truly wants to dismantle mass incarceration.”—Nick Turner, Vera Institute of Justice. “Recently, a loose network of gun-crime victims, as well as men and women who’ve survived sexual assault, violent robberies, and other violations of the social contract . . . have emerged with an alternative policy vision. Among its many champions is Danielle Sered, [who leads] pioneering efforts to provide community-based support to young men of color who’ve been harmed by violence . . . and those responsible for crimes.”—Sarah Stillman, The New Yorker. “Profoundly necessary.” —Michelle Alexander, The New York Times. Danielle Sered founded and is executive director of Common Justice, has worked for other related organizations, and long been active with various groups and coalitions seeking restorative justice. Nikkita Oliver is the executive director of Creative Justice, an arts-based alternative to incarceration and a healing engaged youth-led community-based program. Presented by Town Hall Civics in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company. Event Registration  
 
Crosscut Festival 05/03/2021 - 10:00am to 05/08/2021 - 1:00pm
Virtually Hosted by Crosscut.com
Crosscut Festival
Virtually Hosted by Crosscut.com
In 2021, Crosscut Festival will return in a virtual format, featuring sessions and events streaming online. This special year of the festival will be available at no-cost. The Headliners Night (May 3) is an exclusive festival prologue to celebrate and support great public media and journalism in the Pacific Northwest and beyond; featuring appearances by PBS Newshour anchor, Judy Woodruff, European travel expert Rick Steves, and more exciting guests to be announced. Festival programming will include a week of virtual conversations available online and select sessions will be broadcast on KCTS. Speakers from across the nation and around the region will join us to consider issues in politics, social justice, the economy, science, the environment, and the arts. This year’s speakers include: Dr. Jane Goodall, Dr. Ibram X. Kendi and Keisha N. Blain (editors of Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America 1619-2019), U.S. Congressional Speaker-of-the-House Nancy Pelosi, Judy Woodruff (PBS News Hour), Rick Steves, Rep. Pramila Jayapal (Use the Power You Have), Robert Reich (The System), Robert M. Gates (Exercise of Power), Bill Nye, Alicia Garza (The Purpose of Power), Henry Olson, Carmen Best, Soledad O’Brien, Errin Haines (Editor at Large for The 19th), Robin DiAngelo (White Fragility and the forthcoming Nice Racism), Dr. Jason Johnson (MSNBC and Slate), Peter Singer (Animal Liberation), Sen. Jon Tester (Grounded), Heather Cox Richardson (How the South Won the Civil War), Sen Chris Murphy (The Violence Inside Us), Michael Harriot (of The Root), Dahlia Liethwick (Slate), Abraham Lustgarten (ProPublica), Adam Jentleson, Sonia Shah (The Next Great Migration), Jillian C. York (Silicon Values), Ross Douthat (The Decadent Society), Richard Florida, Kristen Kobes Du Mez, Andrew Marantz (New York Times), Kirsten Powers (CNN), Heather McGee (The Sum of Us), Leah Stokes (Short Circuiting Policy) and many more. Event registration  
 

05/03/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
David B. Williams with Mary Ann Gwinn
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Seattle writer David B. Williams has been hard at chronicling aspects of Seattle’s place as a place, including people’s marks upon it, in a series of books that’s included Too High and Too Steep, Seattle Walks, Waterway, The Seattle Street-Smart Naturalist, and more. He expands in scope and scale with his much-anticipated new book, Homewaters: A Human and Natural History of Puget Sound (University of Washington Press/A Michael J. Repass Book). To be joined in conversation tonight by longtime (now former) Seattle Times book editor Mary Ann Gwinn, this evening, virtually co-presented with our friends at The Seattle Public Library, will give readers a glimpse into the waters and lands this city is set amidst - and David Wiliams’ excellent book exploring this. “In this storied blend of cultural and natural history, we find not only a new understanding of the past but a pathway to the relationships and reciprocity that are essential for every dimension of Puget Sound’s future.” -- Lyanda Lynn Haupt. “Williams does an excellent job of bringing together the complex histories of a complicated place and frames the recent human history of Puget Sound with the natural history of species such as rockfish and sea anemones. Homewaters will sit very comfortably alongside many other classics of regional history.” - Coll Thrush. Co-presented with The Seattle Public Library.   Event Registration  
 

05/04/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Eric Nguyen with Loan Le
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
We celebrate the publication of Eric Nguyen’s hauntingly beautiful debut novel, Things We Lost to the Water (Knopf), on its actual release date. A Vietnamese family arrives in New Orleans, newly landed in the U.S., and from there, each member tries to find their way in this strange new land, and at the same time, keep threads of connection to each other. “This is an elemental book, of water, for sure, but also of other elements of life, including love and loss. Vietnamese people know all about these elements, coming from a country whose entire length is bordered by a sea, and from a history saturated with loss. Love is one element that has enabled their survival, but sometimes at a cost. Eric Nguyen’s powerful novel ripples and gleams with the unpredictable flow and surge of love, which, like water, can drown us or sustain us. From a war to a hurricane, from an ocean to a flood, Things We Lost to the Water proves itself to be a novel that sustains us.”  —Viet Thanh Nguyen. “A devastatingly beautiful debut novel of secrets, deceits, and survivals. An extraordinary tale of a mother and her two sons, torn apart by the storms of Vietnam, to be tested again by the hurricanes of New Orleans. The end has me weeping from joy, sorrow and hope. Eric Nguyen’s talent radiates via his urgent prose and his ability to sketch the fine line between loyalty and betrayal, between what brings us together and what breaks us apart. Things We Lost to the Water is a powerful, stunning, and necessary read!” — Nguyễn Phan Quế Mai. A Washington, D.C. resident who has been awarded fellowships from Lambda Literary, VONA, and the Tin House Writers Workshop, Eric Nguyen is editor in chief of diaCRITICS.org. Joining Eric Nguyen in conversation - virtual as all of this will be - is Loan Le, author of a well-received YA novel,  A Phở Love Story, and a book editor at Atria Books in New York. Event Registration  
 

05/05/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Carol Smith with Claudia Rowe
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
An award-winning journalist and editor at Seattle’s NPR affiliate, KUOW, and a reporter at the Seattle Post-Intelligencer and Los Angeles Times before that, Carol Smith takes on the subject of grief and resilience, her own and others’, in her moving, powerful first book, Crossing the River: Seven Stories That Saved My Life (Abrams Press). Her son’s death, how she faced and lived through that, is one starting point. Then there are the stories of others facing loss or life-altering challenges that both helped her, and should help others in weighing how to go on, and to do so alive, carrying whatever must be carried as part of that. “There is no rule book for how to grieve, so we are left to navigate our own way through it, hopeful that there are compasses in the world to point us in the right direction. Crossing the River is one such compass. An unflinching look at Carol Smith’s grief after the loss of her young son, it illuminates how sometimes going to the very places we want to hide from can show us the way.” -- Ann Hood. “Crossing the River grapples with an unbearable loss, one that no parent, or reader for that matter, ever wants to confront. Carol Smith dares us to enter this world of grief with her and by doing so gives us a vulnerable and brave story of resilience, hope, and healing that can only be found in communion with others.” -- Salamishah Tillet. Joining Carol Smith in conversation this evening will be award-winning Seattle journalist and author Claudia Rowe, whose most recent book is The Spider and the Fly.   Event Registration  
 

05/06/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Maggie Shipstead with Kate Harris
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
A novel that feels as big as the world - that spans the world to a great degree - in the journeys that unfold in Maggie Shipstead’s captivating new novel, Great Circle (Knopf). A novel with Northwest roots - when it is on the ground - this story of a young woman who grows up to become a world-renowned aviator, is then shadowed by a decades-later story of a woman who is cast as the aviator in a film, who finds herself in unexpected ways taken with the woman she is portraying. “Shipstead returns with a breathtaking epic of a female aviator. In 1914, infant twins Marian and Jamie Graves are sent to their dissolute uncle in Montana after their mother dies. There, a married pair of barnstormers inspires 12-year-old Marian, who feels “only lightness” as a passenger during a roll, loop, and nosedive. As a teen trucking hootch during Prohibition, Marian makes a delivery to a brothel, where she meets bootlegger Barclay Macqueen, who sponsors her interest in flying. Later Barclay traps her in a disastrous marriage, and she flees to become a bush pilot in Alaska. Her subsequent exploits are thrillingly and perceptively chronicled: during WWII, she ferries Spitfires for the RAF, and in 1949 embarks on a fateful pole-to-pole circumnavigation of the globe, which leads to a crash in Antarctica, after which she is assumed to have died. Shipstead interweaves stories of Jamie, who becomes an artist and draws battle scenes during WWII, and of her wartime lover, Ruth, with asides about historic aviators (many of them women), and convincingly conveys her characters’ yearning for connection, freedom, and purpose. In a present-day narrative, film star Hadley Baxter, herself orphaned by a plane crash, is cast to portray Marian, an ambitious move for Hadley after having been known for her role in a Twilight-esque fantasy series. Shipstead manages to portray both Marian’s and Hadley’s expanded sense of consciousness as they push the boundaries inscribed around them—Marian’s through flight and Hadley’s through creative inspiration. This is a stunning feat.” - Publishers Weekly. And that is a review, well said. Maggie Shipstead’s previous novels are the best-selling, award-winning Astonish Me and Seating Arrangements. Maggie Shipstead appears in conversation with Kate Harris, author of Land of Lost Borders.   Event Registration  
 

05/06/2021 - 7:30pm

Virtually hosted by Town Hall Seattle
John Feffer
Virtually hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Transformative change can come out of the COVID-19 crisis, which has exposed everything that's wrong with decades of the world's governments betting on militarism, competition and wealth creation. A return to sanity and humane governance is still possible. John Feffer speaks tonight about his book, The Pandemic Pivot: A Report from the Institute for Policy Studies (Seven Stories Press), based on discussions between 68 global thinkers and activists during the summer of 2020, offers insight and an actionable framework for what Cindy Wiesner calls "a just transition to a regenerative, anti-racist, feminist economy."  Both a sobering analysis of the present moment and a hopeful cry on behalf of the power inherent in a global, people-oriented response to the pandemic and the societal breakdown that led to it. John Feffer is director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies. His books include Aftershock: A Journey into Eastern Europe’s Broken Dreams. Event Registration  
 

05/07/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Sarah Sentilles with Cheryl Strayed
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Sarah Sentilles, who did come over to Elliott Bay from her home in Idaho’s Wood River Valley for her brilliant book, Draw Your Weapons, back in the days when such appearances really happened, makes this welcome virtual appearance for her newest, Stranger Care: A Memoir of Loving What Isn’t Ours (Random House). To be joined in conversation by Cheryl Strayed, author of Wild, Tiny Beautiful Things, and Brave Enough, and recently part of a memorable evening such as this with Suleika Jaouad, Sarah Sentilles has written about book about the inner and outer terrain of adoption, from her place here as an adoptive mother. As immense and intense as that narrative is, Sarah Sentilles, in her singular way, takes things to the even deeper notion of love for all manner of ‘others.’ “This is a memoir for anyone who has ever loved a child—or a whale or a bird or a tree, or indeed any part of this hard, beautiful world we all share, which is to say everyone. It is a memoir for everyone.”—Laurie Frankel. “Stranger Care is a book about loving a child without boundaries, without bloodlines, without limits. This is the only book about parenting that I would recommend to anyone, because it strikes at the essential, complicated, and heartbreaking core of what parents do every moment of every day: love, love, love, love. No matter what.”—Emily Rapp Black. “Beautiful, harrowing, and profound . . . With sensitivity and insight, Sarah Sentilles takes readers with her on her tender and wrenching path to motherhood while grappling with the complexities, contradictions, and injustices of a system meant to protect the most vulnerable. I love this book so much it hurts.”—Cheryl Strayed.   Event Registration  
 

05/08/2021 - 11:00am

Virtually hosted by Red May
Red May
Virtually hosted by Red May
Check out the schedule for events all month long!   Full schedule  
 

05/08/2021 - 2:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Darryl Cunningham with Sarah Glidden
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Virtually visiting (we believe) from his home in the UK, acclaimed graphic narrative author Darryl Cunningham comes this way with his newest, Billionaires: The Lives of the Rich and Powerful (Drawn + Quarterly). Billionaires focuses on the stories of Jeff Bezos, the Koch Brothers, and Rupert Murdoch - four among the possible - tracing their various pathways through life and ideology. "A witty but brutal critique of capitalism and corruption.” -  Publishers Weekly. “If you want to know why the world is such a mess, Darryl Cunningham provides a gripping and necessary briefing. His graphic novel Billionaires is some of the best comics journalism I’ve ever read. Cunningham manages to distill a tremendous amount of essential facts about some of the most dangerous and destructive people on earth, information made indelible by his low-key, acerbic cartooning. The drawings are remarkable, varied, and always on point.”  Jeet Heer, The Nation. Joining Darryl Cunningham in conversation will be Sarah Glidden, whose books include How to Understand Israel in 60 Days or Less and Rolling Blackouts. Event Registration  
 
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05/10/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Suzanne Simard
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
We are thrilled to be hosting esteemed professor (Forest Ecology) and researcher Suzanne Simard, who is virtually here from the faraway nearby of British Columbia to talk about her much-anticipated, long-awaited first book Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest (Knopf). This magisterial, moving, at times page-turning book chronicles her life and her  lifelong immersion with trees and the forests which they help comprise. Her work has, from a western perspective, been ground-making, tracing painstaking research which has led to more of us, forestry specialists and lay readers alike, to  knowing how connected plants and trees are with and to each other, and in how many ways. “Galvanizing . . . As Simard elucidates her revolutionary experiments, replete with gorgeous descriptions and moments of fear and wonder, a vision of the forest as an ‘intelligent, perceptive and responsive,’ comes into focus . . . A masterwork of planetary significance.” —Booklist. “Simard artfully blends science with memoir in her eye-opening debut on the ‘startling secrets’ of trees . . . As moving as it is educational, this groundbreaking work entrances.”—Publishers Weekly. “Simard tells the fascinating story that led Richard Powers to base a character on her in his Pulitzer Prize–winning novel The Overstory . . . intimate . . . absorbing . . . engaging . . . the science is solid, and the author’s overarching theme of stewardship is clear, understandable, and necessary.”— Kirkus Reviews. That is just the beginning. This is one of those rare books where we think you won’t see the world you are in the midst of the same way as you did before.   Event Registration  
 

05/11/2021 - 5:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Densho
Daniel James Brown with Tom Ikeda
Virtually Hosted by Densho
Join Densho, Elliott Bay Book Company, and others on this day for the official book launch of Facing the Mountain: A True Story of Japanese American Heroes During World War II (Viking), a new book about WWII Japanese American incarceration and the 442nd RCT by Seattle author  Daniel James Brown, NY Times bestselling author of The Boys in the Boat. The virtual event will feature a conversation between Daniel James Brown and Densho Executive Director Tom Ikeda, who has conducted oral histories with many of the men highlighted in the book. Facing the Mountain grew out of conversations Brown had with Ikeda in 2015. We’re proud to be included as one of four independent bookstores supporting this free event and will have signed copies of the book. Facing the Mountain is an unforgettable chronicle of wartime America and the battlefields of Europe. “This book’s breadth and depth are unparalleled as it poignantly traces the Japanese American thread in the rich fabric of America. We meet compelling individuals, witness war’s horrors and celebrate moments of triumph of the human spirit. The author vividly describes communities confronting prejudice with resilience and patriotism, surviving and ultimately having the opportunity to thrive.” —Terry Shima, T/4, 442nd Regimental Combat Team “Facing the Mountain embodies the sort of far-reaching creative work that they dreamed would be possible when Densho was founded 25 years ago. The book draws upon the stories and words of Japanese American elders and ancestors to tell this history in a way that can reach vast audiences. Daniel James Brown has an exceptional ability to tell compelling, people-centered stories. He humanizes this part of history for a population of readers that may be learning about it for the first time. Facing the Mountain comes to us during a time of deep unrest, a time when our empathy for others is so needed to guide the choices we will make. This book will open hearts.” – Tom Ikeda.   Event registration  
 

05/12/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Lyanda Lynn Haupt with David George Haskell
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Seattle’s Lyanda Lynn Haupt, author of an extraordinary, award-winning  sequence of books mostly centering on birds - Mozart’s Starling, The Urban Bestiary, Crow Planet, Pilgrim on the Great Bird Continent, and Rare Encounters with Ordinary Birds - ventures not too far from the nest for her strikingly beautiful, provocative new book, Rooted: Life at the Crossroads of Science, Nature, and Spirit (Little, Brown Spark). Here, inter- and intra- connections among and between various life forms that we live amidst, are contemplated with questions for we humans to take on. "Exquisite, deceptively simple, lustrous with enigma and pulsing with ache, practical, humble, and honest: Rooted nourishes the wild earth struggling to breathe within us and all around us."—David Abram. “With her deep intuition and expansive attention as our guides, Lyanda Haupt’s gorgeous words create a path to the place where science and spirit meet. It’s a barefoot path that wanders through solitudes and into community with frogs, moose, orca, and our own wildness.”—Robin Wall Kimmerer. David George Haskell, author of The Forest Unseen and The Songs of Trees, and to be virtually on hand in conversation with Lyanda Lynn Haupt,  says this of Rooted: “An extraordinary guide to wonder and belonging. Shattering dualities—science/spirit, dark/light, human/nature—Haupt leads us into the delicious presence of the living Earth. In a time of isolation and fragmentation, her many insights are beautiful and much-needed invitations to wholeness and connection.” Event Registration  
 

05/12/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Seattle Public Library
Jewell Parker Rhodes
Virtually Hosted by Seattle Public Library
One of these days, Seattle will properly get to welcome, in-person, one of this country’s most celebrated writers, who moved here seemingly as all was shutting down for the pandemic. That celebrated writer is Jewell Parker Rhodes, award-winning author of numerous novels and books for younger readers and adults, a memoir, two books about writing and getting published for Black writers, and the Founding Artistic Director and Piper Endowed Chair at the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing at Arizona State University. Until such day as gatherings of size can happen, we celebrate virtually. And pay attention. This evening is occasioned by a new edition of Jewell Parker Rhodes’ 1997 novel for adults, Magic City (Harper Perennial). The timing of this new edition is not coincidental. Magic City takes its title from the Magic City that was Greenwood,  the thriving Black center of Tulsa, Oklahoma, which would be devastated by a White mob that burned, destroyed, and killed in one of the great racist massacre horrors of U.S. history one hundred years ago.  “Jewell Parker Rhodes’s Magic City takes an ugly chapter of American history and turns it into a human tale of vulnerable people with imperfect motives and skewed vision, people who interact in dire ways with monumental consequences…. I could not, would not put this book down, not even after its last searing sentence.”- Julianne Malveaux. “In Magic City, Jewell Parker Rhodes has made a tragic American story come vividly to life and has made these people—black and white and red, rich and poor, educated and illiterate—all achingly human. Rhodes must be commended for bringing such an important story front and center, and for making it as instructive and as moving as it is horrific.” -Randall Kenan. Co-presented by the Northwest African American Museum, The Seattle Public Library, and Elliott Bay Book Company. Event Registration  
 

05/12/2021 - 7:30pm

Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Anna Sale with Angela Garbes
Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Anna Sale, the host of WNYC’s hugely popular ‘Death, Sex, & Money’ podcast, takes what it is to have those soul-baring and soul-bearing conversations and puts it into her much-anticipated first book, Let’s Talk About Hard Things (Simon & Schuster). For this virtual Town Hall visit, which may not be all hard conversation, she’ll be joined by Seattle’s Angela Garbes, author of the bestselling Like a Mother, and formerly a writer at The Stranger, and even more formerly, a bookseller at Elliott Bay. Anna Sale’s book is about how she has the conversations she has - and how others can, too. "In Let's Talk About Hard Things, Anna Sale brings us fascinating conversations that feel both intensely personal and widely universal, then shows us how to start having them in our own lives. You will laugh, cry, nod in recognition, and by the end, feel like no topic is off limits when it comes to creating meaningful connection. I want to give a copy of this book to every family member, friend, and therapy patient I see.” —Lori Gottlieb. "Anna Sale has a real gift for cutting through the white noise that so often overwhelms our most urgent, high-stakes conversations. She's teaching us how to listen to one another again. No one can save us from life's plot twists—and no one should—but page by page, sentence by sentence, Sale is committed to seeing us through." —Saeed Jones. Presented by Town Hall Arts & Culture in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company Event registration  
 

05/13/2021 - 12:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Frye Creative Aging Series
Anne Basting
Virtually Hosted by Frye Creative Aging Series
The Frye Museum’s Creative Aging Series today features this midday appearance by MacArthur Foundation fellowship recipient Anne Basting, known for her pioneering work with older people, and author of Creative Care: A Revolutionary Approach to Dementia and Elder Care (Harper One). “Creative Care is a love letter to aging. Not a prescription filled with should, it’s a beautifully rendered invitation to be curious and flexible, meeting elders wherever they happen to be in the moment and making that moment richer, sweeter, and more meaningful for all.” - Cynthia Orange. "Invites us to shift focus from how well we remember the past to how well we inhabit the present--for ourselves and with others. Basting reveals the power of creativity to expand our humanity and enrich the time we have."- Marie-Therese Connolly. Presented by the Frye Art Museum’s Creative Aging Series. Event registration  
 

05/13/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Shary Flenniken with Sarah Glidden
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Something of a landmark publication is celebrated here today as once-up-a-time Seattle cartoonist Shary Flenniken (now based in Brooklyn), will be joined in conversation by cartoonist author Sarah Glidden, on the occasion of the release of Trots and Bonnie (New York Review of Books Comics). This book brings together, so far as we know, the first appearance in book form of Trots and Bonnie, who appeared back in the day in the pages of National Lampoon, where Shary Flenniken was an editor forty years ago. Shary Flenniken’s work also appeared in such magazines as Mad, Premiere, and Details. She was a pioneer in her time - and the work, as response to Trots and Bonnie’s publication, is no less fresh than it was years ago. “Drawn in an exquisite pastiche on the classic comic strip style of George McManus (Bringing Up Father) and the like, [Trots and Bonnie is] a slyly whimsical take on feminism, hippies, the counterculture, and more. . . . Flenniken [is] . . . one of the best cartoonists of her time, full stop.” —Heidi MacDonald, Comics Beat. “Trots and Bonnie is hilarious, poignant, raunchy, gorgeously drawn, and more relevant than ever. Shary Flenniken is an absolute genius.” —Roz Chast. Sarah Glidden’s books include How to Understand Israel in 60 Days or Less and Rolling Blackouts.   Event Registration  
 

05/13/2021 - 6:30pm

Virtual hosted by Massy Arts Society
Callum Angus with Hazel Jane Plante & Corinne Manning
Virtual hosted by Massy Arts Society
Tonight we’ll also join Massy Arts Society and Montreal based Metonymy Press in presenting Portland author Callum Angus in conversation with Hazel Jane Plante and Corinne Manning. Callum Angus will be celebrating the publication of A Natural History of Transition (Metonymy Press), a collection of short stories that disrupts the notion that trans people can only have one transformation. Like the landscape studied over eons, change does not have an expiration date for these trans characters, who grow as tall as buildings, turn into mountains, unravel hometown mysteries, and give birth to cocoons. Portland-based author Callum Angus infuses his work with a mix of alternative history, horror, and a reality heavily dosed with magic. Callum Angus is a trans writer and editor. His work has appeared in Nat. Brut, West Branch, LA Review of Books, Catapult, The Common, Seventh Wave Magazine and elsewhere. He has received support from Lambda Literary and Signal Fire Foundation for the Arts, and he holds an MFA from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He is the founding editor of the journal smoke and mold. Hazel Jane Plante is a librarian, cat photographer, and writer. Her debut novel Little Blue Encyclopedia (for Vivian) (Metonymy Press, 2019) was given a Lambda Literary award for trans fiction. She also releases music under the name lo-fi lioness and helms the podcast t4t, which is about writing while trans. Corinne Manning is a prose writer and literary organizer. Their stories and essays have been published widely, including in Toward an Ethics of Activism and Shadow Map: An Anthology of Survivors of Sexual Assault. Corinne founded The James Franco Review, a project that sought to address implicit bias in the publishing industry. We Had No Rules (Arsenal Pulp Press, 2020) is their first book. Massy Arts Society is a community hub dedicated to supporting the practices of Indigenous and underrepresented artists. Without a fixed location, we are able to build community across a number of sites and through partnerships. Co-presented by Massy Arts Society, Metonymy Press and the Elliott Bay Book Company   Event registration  
 

05/14/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Claudia Castro Luna, Honorée Fannone Jeffers, Sasha LaPointe
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
The book response to the racial justice protests of 2020 are taking many forms and will, some of them structural within the book world, some in the books being published. One eloquent, very direct response is a new anthology, There’s A Revolution Outside, My Love: Letters from a Crisis (Vintage), edited by recent U.S. Poet Laureate Tracy K. Smith and poet/editor John Freeman. Over twenty writers and poets, some renowned, some for whom this will be the first larger exposure, from across the length and breadth of the land wrote dispatches from their respective places, many published in the online book review publication, Literary Hub. Each is varied in its way, and yet with common themes that can be drawn. Seattle poet Claudia Castro Luna, Tacoma poet/prose writer Sasha LaPointe, and Oklahoma-based poet/prose writer/scholar Honorée Fanonne Jeffers will, for this program, read from their pieces, and discuss whence this writing springs from, in the context of both this book and this country.  “Angry, rueful, and defiant, the impressive roster of award-winning writers and academics portrays a nation wracked by pain…. An eloquent and urgent collection.” —Kirkus Reviews. “Written from the inner chambers of the heart, resonating with the questions that keep us up at night, and offering the recognition and generosity…. This book is a promise, a solace, a sounding of our cries for justice and need for love. It’s nothing short of essential.” —Garnette Cadogan, Literary Hub. Claudia Castro Luna is author of the poetry collection, Killing Marías, was Seattle’s first Civic Poet and has just concluded terms as Washington State Poet Laureate. Sasha LaPointe (Upper Skagit/Nooksack) has a memoir, Red Paint, forthcoming from Counterpoint, and a poetry collection, Rose Quartz, coming from Milkweed. Honorée Fanonne Jeffers’ most recent poetry collection, a poetic biography of Phillis Wheatley Peters, The Age of Phillis, was longlisted for the National Book Award, shortlisted for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and received the NAACP Image Award. A monumental first novel, The Love Songs of W.E.B. DuBois (HarperCollins), is forthcoming, with an Elliott Bay virtual reading slated for August 10 (stay tuned!). Event registration  
 

05/14/2021 - 7:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Hugo House
Russell Banks with Jennifer Haigh
Virtually Hosted by Hugo House
In his new novel, Foregone (HarperCollins), which is structured around a character’s secret memories, Russell Banks—the author of Affliction and The Sweet Hereafter, which were both adapted into critically acclaimed films—challenges assumptions about a lost chapter in American history and questions the nature of recollection itself. For his Word Works lecture, Banks will discuss how character is defined in Foregone through memories, confabulations, fictions, and dreams. Joining Russell Banks in conversation for Hugo House this evening is novelist and short story writer, Jennifer Haigh, most recently author of Heat and Light. Event Registration  
 

05/15/2021 - 11:00am

Virtually hosted by Red May
Red May
Virtually hosted by Red May
Check out the schedule for events all month long!   Full schedule  
 

05/15/2021 - 2:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Ishle Yi Park with Taiyo Na
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Poet/songwriter/performer Ishle Yi Park, whose multiple-award-winning debut book of poetry, The Temperature of This Water, appeared over fifteen years ago, makes this welcome return to book form with her brilliant book-length epic poem, Angel & Hannah: A Novel in Verse (One World). Not that she - with a few musical CDs and touring stints with Def Poetry Jam and more - hasn’t been seen or heard from. Presently based in Hawai’i, Ishle Yi Park was the first woman poet laureate of Queens. Angel & Hannah is a love song from that place, of that place, most certainly. “Angel & Hannah is triumphant. Ishle Yi Park’s narrative sequence of sonnets is sensuous, tender, and faceted like cut glass. I feel protective of Angel and Hannah. I want their love to flourish like an empress tree growing in an abandoned lot in Queens. These fresh and absolutely necessary poems of a cross-racial romance need to be trumpeted from the rooftops, overtaking the canonized Romeos and Juliets and Heathcliffs and Catherines. I love this book.”—Cathy Park Hong. “Ishle Yi Park speaks to us from the most tender, furious, and emotionally raw space in her breathtaking novel in verse. Angel & Hannah makes love feel revolutionary and desire feel like embattled truth. Reading it, I was often breathless, believing in the brilliance that is the bruised wonder of youth. Park brings us as close to a heart’s fire as we are willing to go and leaves us soaring over the possibility of a new dream.”—Tina Chang. Joining Ishle Yi Park in conversation today will be Queens-based writer, educator, musician Taiyo Na. His writing has appeared in Aperture, Hyphen, and Poet’s House.   Event registration  
 
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05/16/2021 - 4:00pm

Virtually hosted by Chinese American Citizens Alliance and Seattle Unite.
Jane Wong, Dorothy Chan, & W. Todd Kaneko
Virtually hosted by Chinese American Citizens Alliance and Seattle Unite.
Join Jane Wong, Dorothy Chan, and W. Todd Kaneko for an afternoon of poetry and discussion about Asian American poetry in our current cultural climate. Dorothy Chan is the author of Revenge of the Asian Woman (Diode Editions, 2019), Attack of the Fifty-Foot Centerfold (Spork Press, 2018), and the chapbook Chinatown Sonnets (New Delta Review, 2017). She was a 2020 and 2014 Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Fellowship finalist, a 2020 finalist for the Lambda Literary Award in Bisexual Poetry for Revenge of the Asian Woman, and a 2019 recipient of the Philip Freund Prize in Creative Writing from Cornell University.  Jane Wong's poems can be found in places such as Best American Nonrequired Reading 2019, American Poetry Review, Agni, Poetry, Virginia Quarterly Review, and others. A Kundiman fellow, she is the author of Overpour (Action Books, 2016), and How to Not Be Afraid of Everything (Alice James, forthcoming in October 2021). She is an Associate Professor of Creative Writing at Western Washington University. W. Todd Kaneko is the author of This Is How the Bone Sings (Black Lawrence Press 2020) and The Dead Wrestler Elegies, 2nd Edition (New Michigan Press 2021), and Slash / Slash, winner of the 2020 Diode Editions Chapbook Contest. A Kundiman Fellow, he lives with his family in Grand Rapids, Michigan where he teaches at Grand Valley State University. Event registration  
 

05/17/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Daniel James Brown with Tom Ikeda & Lori Matsukawa
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
A week after a national launch, Densho, Seattle’s nationally-esteemed non-profit organization devoted to keeping alive the history of the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II, and continued lessons from then for today, and Elliott Bay Book Company present this Seattle launch program for Facing the Mountain: A True Story of Japanese American Heroes During World War II (Viking), a major new book about WWII Japanese American incarceration and the 442nd RCT by Seattle writer Daniel James Brown. The virtual event will feature a conversation between Daniel James Brown and Densho Executive Director Tom Ikeda, (who has conducted oral histories with many of the men highlighted in the book) and will be hosted by broadcast journalist Lori Matsukawa, who has roots in both Seattle and in Hawai’i. We look forward to a more Seattle-centric discussion this evening, with some attention also to less well known events in Hawai’i, and we hope that you’ll bring your questions. “Facing the Mountain proves that the savagery of war isn’t restricted to foreign battlefields. Many went to war – those who remained incarcerated endured the wrath of their fellow countrymen. It is said that to be an American we should strive to live life worthy of the sacrifices of those who came before us. Our bearing with each other is dependent on it.” —Lt Col Michael J. Yaguchi, USAF (ret), Commander, Nisei Veterans Committee. “Daniel James Brown brings to life the gripping true story of Japanese Americans whose steely heroism fought Nazism abroad and racism at home. Bound by Japanese values of filial piety, giri (social obligation) and gaman (endurance) and forged in the crucible of brutal combat, the soldiers served the very country that locked their families in American concentration camps for no crime other than looking like the enemy while camp resisters fought for justice denied.”—Lori L. Matsukawa. Daniel James Brown is the author of The Boys in the Boat, The Indifferent Stars Above, and Under a Flaming Sky. Tom Ikeda is executive director of Densho, a Seattle-based non-profit dedicated to collecting, preserving, and sharing Japanese American history and promoting social justice and equity. Lori Matsukawa, who recently retired after 36 years as an anchor and reporter at KING TV, won two Northwest Regional Emmy Awards, one in 2018 for her series “Prisoners in Their Own Land” about the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II and another in 2019 for “Shane Sato: Portraits of Courage” about a photographer's mission to photograph Nisei veterans, who served as part of America's "Greatest Generation."   Presented by Densho and Elliott Bay Book Company. Event Registration  
 

05/18/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Paul Shoemaker with Doug Baldwin
Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Seattle philanthropist, founder of Social Venture Partners, and ‘social impact thought leader’ Paul Shoemaker does some visionary heavy lifting with his new book, Taking Charge of Change: How Rebuilders Solve Hard Problems (Harper Collins Leadership), managing to make it subject  look like something reasonably attainable. He takes readers through case studies, individuals and situations where things that looked challenging if not impossible were taken on. Seattle’s Trish Millines’ work bringing young people of color to high tech, and vice versa, is one such story. Joining Paul Shoemaker in conversation will be Doug Baldwin, the former Seattle Seahawk star wide receiver, who was involved in community activity and philanthropy while playing, and is now even more active. “Paul Shoemaker’s book provides inspiration and a pathway for the 2020s.” - Kathy Calvin. Presented by Town Hall Arts & Culture in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company. Event registration  
 

05/18/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Francisco Goldman with Rivka Galchen
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
This evening helps mark the welcome return of Francisco Goldman, virtually here with his first novel in a decade - and what a novel Monkey Boy (Grove Press) is. The author of The Long Night of White Chickens, The Ordinary Seaman, The Divine Husband, and Say Her Name received several awards among them. His non-fiction books, The Art of Political Murder and The Interior Circuit: A Mexico City Chronicle, also received honors. Then, Monkey Boy: “Francisco Goldman . . . Francisco Goldberg? . . . Frankie Gee!—crafter of the tenderest dirtiest love scenes!—the wisest and spookiest children!—the fathers whose monstrosity breaks our hearts with compassion for them—who else can do all this? Francisco Goldman is uncategorizable, as is this book which made me grow a second heart just to contain all its fierce tenderness. Goldman has been my literary hero from his first entrancing Long Night of White Chickens to this latest take-no-prisoners Monkey Boy. He is a true original, that rarest of writers, the kind we cannot live without.”—Susan Choi. “From the painful intimate violence in a suburban New England home, to racial cruelty among high school teenagers, to the US government’s political and military interventionism in Latin America, Goldman’s sweeping gaze runs through multiple circuits of America’s violence, showing us how deeply connected they in fact are. With the exact balance of outrage and hope, Monkey Boy takes us on an eye-opening journey, full of tenderness and horror, through the often-ignored layers of this country’s history. A powerful, necessary book.”—Valeria Luiselli. “Francisco Goldman, one of our most brilliant political writers, is also, miraculously, a Chekhov of the heart. This novel is wild, funny, and wrenching, as well as a profound act of retrieval and transformation.”—Rivka Galchen. Rivka Galchen, the same just-quoted, herself the author of numerous excellent books, including the fabulous forthcoming novel, Everyone Knows Your Mother is a Witch (due June 8, from Farrar, Straus & Giroux), will join Francisco Goldman this evening in conversation. Which should be a terrific one. Signed bookplates for Monkey Boy should be available.   Event Registration  
 

05/19/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Mira Sethi with Shahina Piyarali
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
We’re not sure where among her home places of Karachi, Lahore, and San Francisco noted actor and writer Mira Sethi will be joining us from, but wherever it is, you won’t want to miss her extraordinary fiction debut, the newly released book of stories, Are You Enjoying? (Knopf). To be joined in conversation by Seattle writer and Tasveer board chair Shahina Piyarali, Mira Sethi gives readers a knowing, surprising look into elements of contemporary Pakistani society, doing so with an assurance in narrative voice that belies this being a first book. “In Sethi’s striking debut collection, strong women face myriad challenges … In the witty and moving title story, Soni, 27, is having an affair with 40-something Asher, a famous former squash player who now runs a gym, is married with children, and can’t believe his luck. ‘My being with you is like that man getting a visa to America,’ he tells her, pointing to a street sweeper. She exults in her power over him, but a surprising turn reverses their relationship’s dynamic, making for a fascinating character study. Sethi’s writing brings a fresh view to Pakistani life.” - Publishers Weekly. “Fresh, intelligent, and bold: Mira Sethi’s stories open up fascinating slices of contemporary life in Pakistan.” —Mohsin Hamid. In addition to acting, Mira Sethi has also worked as a journalist, writing op-ed pieces for The New York Times, The Guardian, and The Wall Street Journal, where she has also worked as a books editor. Co-presented by Tasveer and Elliott Bay Book Company. Event Registration  
 

05/20/2021 - 5:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Trent Reedy and Jawad Arash
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Spokane writer Trent Reedy, author of a number of YA and middle-reader novels, and Afghan writer and teacher Jawad Arash - who still lives and teaches there - have collaborated on a new, co-written novel, Enduring Freedom (Workman). This is not the first time the two have partnered on a book project, as Trent Reedy drew on Jawad Arash’s story for an award-winning middle-reader novel, Words in the Dust. This story, of a young Afghan man who suddenly finds his life and already besieged country engulfed by yet more war, and a young U.S. man whose aspiration to be a journalist get upended  by being dispatched to Afghanistan, is one of seeking to learn about commonalities and differences in being human, even under traumatic circumstances.  “A touching tale of understanding and friendship . . . The message of education as a vehicle for progress and dismantling hatred is one that will strike a chord with readers.”— Kirkus Reviews. Please to note: because of present circumstances in Afghanistan, Jawad Arash will be joining by audio link only. Why this is, and the situation there now will likely be part of the conversation here. Event Registration  
 

05/20/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Presented by Town Hall Seattle
Ian Manuel
Virtually Presented by Town Hall Seattle
A riveting, heartrending, story of unjust punishment - on several levels - is told in Ian Manuel’s My Time Will Come: A Memoir of Crime, Punishment, Hope, and Redemption (Pantheon). At age fourteen he was sentenced to life without parole for a horrible crime he committed - but one that was not a homicide. Moreover, for eighteen years he was kept in solitary confinement for minor infractions within the prison’s systems of behavior and punishment. “In 1990, the then 13-year-old Manuel shot young mother Debbie Baigrie during a street robbery in Tampa, Fla. Baigrie recovered, but Manuel was sentenced to life without parole ... What followed was a harrowing, decades-long journey through Florida’s prisons, where beatings and sprayings with irritant gases were routine … But his story took an unlikely turn after a judicial rights group took up his case. He reconciled with Baigrie, leading to his release from prison in 2016. Manuel’s account, told in prose and poetry, is gritty and unflinching and poignant throughout. The result is a gripping narrative about a man’s struggle to prove his discarded existence still has meaning. This is a stunner.” - Publishers Weekly.  “Ian is magic. His story is difficult and heartbreaking, but he takes us places we need to go to understand why we must do better.” —Bryan Stevenson, from the Foreword. Ian Manuel today lives in New York City, and is a motivational speaker at schools and social organizations around the country. Presented by Town Hall Civics in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company. Event Registration  
 

05/21/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Norman Fischer with Cynthia Schrager
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Esteemed Zen Buddhist priest, teacher, writer, and poet Norman Fischer, who, through his writing, teaching, and example has guided, instructed, and inspired many, makes this welcome Elliott Bay return in virtual form to talk about his newest book, When You Greet Me I Bow: Notes and Reflections from a Life in Zen (Shambhala). For this program, he’ll be joined in conversation by Cynthia Schrager, who in all likelihood knows the inner and outer working of this book better than anyone beyond Norman Fischer, as she edited it. "This book is funny—but serious too, as any book about dedication must be. It is also humble, inviting, clear. Most people probably think of Zen as solitary and austere; Fischer, however, emphasizes the commitment to a community of practice. We all need that and most of us have no idea where to find it. This book is a good place to start." —Rae Armantrout. "This book is a treasure. Eastern dharma has truly been transmitted to the West. The book is also beautifully structured. Help with love, relationship, grief, death, injustice, politics, is close at hand. Reading Fischer’s book in these hard times emits a sigh of relief. Things almost make sense—even if upside down sense—the body lets go and relaxes." —Natalie Goldberg. Norman Fischer is also the author of twenty books of poetry, give or take, and such works on Buddhist practice as Training in Compassion, What is Zen?, The World Could Be Otherwise, Solid Ground, and Taking Our Places. Event Registration  
 

05/22/2021 - 11:00am

Virtually hosted by Red May
Red May
Virtually hosted by Red May
Check out the schedule for events all month long!   Full schedule  
 
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05/23/2021 - 2:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Carol Leonnig with Jacob Soboroff
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Washington Post investigative reporter, three-time Pulitzer Prize-winner Carol Leonnig, ‘seen’ not so long ago as co-author with Philip Rucker of the bestselling A Very Stable Genius, is virtually here with her timely newest book, Zero Fail: The Rise and Fall of the Secret Service (Random House). Focusing especially on the years since the President Kennedy assassination on up through the Obama and Trump administrations, and including the January 6 insurrection, this is a compelling chronicle of an agency’s rise and fall. Drawn from years of close reporting, and from dozens of interviews with present and former agents, other government officials, and whistleblowers, it’s anticipated that this book will make news - as her other writing has done. Carol Leonnig is appearing in conversation with NBC/MSNBC Correspondent Jacob Soboroff. Event Registration  
 

05/24/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Sylvia Byrne Pollack with Elizabeth Austen
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Having lived a full, busy life - and still doing so - Seattle’s Sylvia Byrne Pollack started writing poetry in earnest over a decade ago, in her sixties. Poems along the way have appeared in Floating Bridge Review, Crab Creek Review, Clover, and Antiphon, among other publications, and her work has been recognized with a Mason’s Road Literary Award, a Mineral School residency, and being a Jack Straw fellow. And now there is a splendid book: Risking It (Red Mountain Press). “These smart, funny, beautifully crafted poems show us a whole life lived wholeheartedly. The various parts intertwine, just as they do in the book, which is one arc rather than separate sections. The riveting voice that leads us through them is sometimes refracted by other personas ... The poems touch on food, love, the natural world, politics, joy and despair, illness and aging, and mortality, but always return, finally to joy and celebration.  They dare us to be fully present in our lives.” –Sharon Bryan. “The best company has intelligence, humanity, conviction, and some je ne sais quoi factor: mischief; lovability; great dance moves.  Risking It is that kind of company. Sylvia Byrne Pollack writes with relish about mortality and long love, deafness, the “frizzante bubbles of mania” and depression, from Mona Lisa’s erotic life to rabbit test subjects to a soulful beach rock named Gregory. Pollack’s poems are intimately familiar with the dark–especially her alter egos, Letitia and the deaf woman–but counter it with the bright glow of playful language and a keen, reverent mind … This collection is a delight.” - Kathleen Flenniken. With Sylvia Byrne Pollack on this celebratory evening will be Seattle poet, teacher, and former Washington State Poet Laureate Elizabeth Austen. Event Registration  
 

05/25/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Aminatta Forna
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
One of our favorite writers, in whatever form she writes - fiction, memoir, or with her totally engaging new book of essays, The Window Seat: Notes from a Life in Motion (Grove Press), Aminatta Forna writes of travel and places, their bearing on life and its meaning. That this comes from a time when she, presumably, and most of us have not been in so much motion should make the things she reflects upon and explores here all the more telling. “If you had to take the middle seat and sit next to anyone with the window seat, Aminatta Forna would be the perfect stranger to talk to. Wise, witty, sensitive, and sophisticated—about travel, politics, globalization, writing, and the nuances of the human heart and soul—Forna has lived a life of which many of us would be envious. Her essays illuminate that life but ours as well, making us understand the many ways we are connected, even if we only see each other from a distance.”—Viet Thanh Nguyen. “The essays in this magnificent collection are exhilarating and expansive meditations on traveling—and living—in places so consequential and historically significant that they cannot be measured simply by distance. Who are we far from home? What becomes of those who return, and what do we owe to those who stay behind? These are just a few of the questions that Forna raises in this sharply rendered, personal collection. But she doesn’t stop there: by the end, this book invites a reckoning with our rightful place on this earth. Generous in spirit and breathtakingly intelligent, The Window Seat reminds us why Forna is one of our best writers working today.”—Maaza Mengiste. Aminatta Forna’s books include the memoir The Devil That Danced on Water, and the novels, Ancestor Stones, The Memory of Love, The Hired Man, and the absolutely brilliant Happiness. Event Registration  
 

05/26/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Brian Broome with Damon Young
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Poet and screenwriter Brian Broome, presently on the faculty of the creative writing program at the University of Pittsburgh puts it on the page with beautiful urgency and eloquence in his autobiographical first book, Punch Me Up to the Gods: A Memoir (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt). This is Brian Broome’s reckoning on and with Blackness, masculinity, and addiction to singular ends. “Punch Me Up to the Gods obliterates what we thought were the limitations of not just the American memoir, but the possibilities of the American paragraph. I’m not sure a book has ever had me sobbing, punching the air, dying of laughter, and needing to write as much as Brian Broome’s staggering debut. This shit is special.”—Kiese Laymon. “Punch Me Up to the Gods is some of the finest writing I have ever encountered and one of the most electrifying, powerful, simply spectacular memoirs I—or you—have ever read. And you will read it; you must read it. It contains everything we all crave so deeply: truth, soul, brilliance, grace. It is a masterpiece of a memoir and Brian Broome should win the Pulitzer Prize for writing it. I am in absolute awe and you will be, too.”—Augusten Burroughs. Joining Brian Broome in conversation for this virtual program is writer, critic, and humorist Damon Young, himself the author of an acclaimed memoir, What Doesn’t Kill You Makes You Blacker: A Memoir in Essays (Ecco). He’s also the founder of VerySmartBrothas, and is a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times and columnist for GQ. Co-presented by the Northwest African American Museum and Elliott Bay Book Company. Event Registration  
 

05/27/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Maryanne O’Hara
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Maryanne O’Hara’s daughter, Caitlin, was born with cystic fibrosis and died of the disease at age 33. She began chronicling the story first on a blog and recently published a memoir, Little Matches: A Memoir of Grief and Light (HarperOne). Tonight she’ll speak about her experiences and her memoir,  and she will also conduct a short workshop on conducting life interviews, which is part of the legacy work she now does as a certified end-of-life doula. End-of-life doulas provide support and comfort to clients and their families at the end of life. She will share practical tips on the language to use, questions to ask, and framing that helps put the subject at ease. She was moved to do this work because, after her daughter’s death, she was left wondering why she hadn’t gathered up as much of Caitlin while she could. Made more recordings, asked more questions, given her daughter the power to author her legacy. “This luminous, harrowing memoir reads like a mystery, even though we know how the story (heartbreakingly) ends. This is a tale of a mother’s devotion and grief, yes, but when I closed Little Matches, tears standing still in my eyes, I was left with a sense that I had met not one but two remarkable spirits, my world enlarged.”  –Dani Shapiro. Event Registration  
 

05/27/2021 - 7:30pm

Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Mickey Huff and Andy Lee Roth
Virtually Hosted by Town Hall Seattle
Now going into its 45th year, Project Censored annually compiles an important publication concerning what is and is not covered in this country’s media. This evening virtually brings Project Censored’s Mickey Huff, who has directed the organization since 2010, and Andy Lee Roth to Town Hall to discuss the year 2020, as reflected in the newly released Project Censored’s State of the Free Press 2021 (Seven Stories Press). Edited by Mickey Huff and Andy Lee Roth, this work is becoming more vital and necessary by the year. Presented by Town Hall Civics in partnership with Elliott Bay Book Company. Event registration  
 

05/28/2021 - 6:00pm

Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
Joan Silber with Peter Ho Davies
Virtually Hosted by Elliott Bay Book Company
One of our finest fiction writers when it comes to dissecting and discerning the complex, often secretive webs of adults in relationship, over time and place, Joan Silber is virtually here this evening with her newest novel, Secrets of Happiness (Counterpoint). “Joan Silber is a masterful writer of multifaceted characters in complex relationship dynamics . . . Her new novel follows a man harboring a secret—he’s leading two lives, part of two families—and the impact of his deception radiates far beyond him.” —Arianna Rebolini, Buzzfeed. “Secrets of Happiness unfolds across families and lovers, across time and expectations, across the country and across the world, and the bigger it gets, the more it shows how deeply connected we are. Joan Silber writes with a frankness and freshness that draws the reader closer with every page. It would be impossible to overstate just how good this book is.”   —Ann Patchett. Joan Silber is the author of nine books of fiction, with her most recent, Improvement, winning both the National Book Critics Circle Award and the PEN/Faulkner Award. Joining Joan Silber this evening will be Peter Ho Davies, who appeared here at Elliott Bay in virtual form this past winter for his own excellent recent novel, A Lie Someone Told You About Yourself (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt). Event Registration  
 
 
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